What Retirees Want!

You might be surprised at today’s retiree’s choices.

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Most people, when they hear about retirees moving or looking to buy a new home, imagine somewhere sunny, with palm trees, and something small, like a condo or considerably downsized house. According to this survey on Forbes.com, performed in 2015, those antiquated ideas are way off!

So what are today’s retirees into, when it comes to this new phase of home life?

Staying Put

Surprisingly, most boomers choose not to relocate to a new state when buying a new home. And downsizing is becoming a myth! Many of today’s retirees choose a similar-sized home, or even one that is a little bigger. Why? To make room for visitors, family, and even hobbies. In fact, the most popular home improvement project for a retiree is adding on a personal office!

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Less retirees are choosing this scene for their daily lives.

Freedom Threshold

It’s no surprise that the boomer generation rejects the old view of retirement: relaxing in the sun, living in a tiny condo. Today’s retiree has planned meticulously to live their lives to the fullest! They are choosing lifestyles based on the things they like and want, instead of living where they have an easy commute to work or better access to schools for their kids. This mindset is called the Freedom Threshold.

The biggest advantage of reaching the Freedom Threshold? Living longer! Stats show that retirees aren’t just fading away after punching their last time card. Instead, they’re living longer, fuller lives, and choosing dream homes they’ve saved for instead of just settling for something tiny.

So what is the biggest motivator for retirees when choosing their next home? Proximity to family. Retirees who stay in-state do so to be close to family, and 29% those who move away have the same reason: to follow family.

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Survey says: family is the most important factor in retirees deciding where to live.

Not Just Fun and Games

Proximity of family is also on this checklist of things to consider when planning a retirement relocation, on CNBC.com. In addition, if you’re looking to make a major lifestyle change (in addition to retiring!) keep in mind differences in taxes from state to state, and whether keeping your original residence to rent out or selling it outright will be more advantageous.

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Even though schools and work commute are no longer as important, you should still weigh your options carefully.

Medical care is also a major consideration. Even if you plan to snowbird north for the summer or south for the winter, you shouldn’t rely only on doctors in your home state. Even in rural areas, Tennessee has good access to emergency care, and clinics and hospitals are a short drive in most locations. But, still, do your homework and make sure you like the local medical care before committing!

Consider East Tennessee

Here in East Tennessee, the same mild climate, beautiful landscape, low cost of living and pleasant standard of living—including tons of stuff to do!—are good for both young, working families and those looking to retire. In Tennessee, you can get the best of both worlds: staying close to family, and living well on a fixed income!

 

If you’re looking to retire in East Tennessee, and you want to find your dream home, check out DarleneReeves-Kline.com. We’d love to help.

Maximalism!

Maximalism is coming back in response to minimalism!

We’ve written before about how millenials are all about minimalism. The trends today are all about smaller homes, smaller footprints on the environment, even capsule wardrobes to minimize the amount of clothes that need to fit inside the smaller closet!

The idea behind it comes from many cultural sources, but probably the most modern and recognizable is this book: The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, by Marie Kondo. The author put together a life philosophy and style and created an entire social movement! In her view, if something is not useful to you, or very beautiful, then get rid of it! So, no keeping your grandmother’s old shoes, or that falling-down piece of furniture (unless you truly think those things are useful or beautiful.) It’s a great philosophy to kick-start your decluttering efforts.

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Some people get really, really into the minimalist lifestyle, squeezing a four-person family into a renovated school bus, or throwing out everything in their kitchen except enough plates for four people, a food processor and two pans! The movement has become a kind of challenge: how little can you live with?

But there is a backlash coming in the style world, and it’s one that many of our boomers will recognize: it’s maximalism! Instead of simple, clean design with neutral colors and only a few pieces of furniture to adorn a room, maximalism is all about color, and patterns and squeezing in as much as you possibly can into one space!

Of course, you could go way too far with the idea, and keep way, way too much. That’s the danger of this end of the style spectrum: you could risk becoming a pack rat for fear of throwing something out that might be useful or stylish or just plain catch your fancy again in a year or two.

Interestingly, while minimalism seems to embrace small-home living as a means of saving money, forcing the minimum of physical belongings and reducing our environmental footprint, maximalism doesn’t really fit into a specific-sized place. It’s more about filling up whatever space is available.

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Parents of small children especially relate to the tug-of-war between maximalism and minimalism! A room overflowing with toys can get overwhelming, making even the most practical parent break down and scream, “That’s it! We’re getting rid of everything in here!” But, still, each new holiday or visit to the grandparents’ house brings on something else that’s colorful and fun, and deserves a place of honor somewhere in the house (preferably the kids’ rooms!)

The truth is that most of us probably fit somewhere in the middle of the spectrum. We like a little bit of color, have a collection or two of things that may not really be necessary but make us happy. It’s probably a good idea to go through once every year or two and clean out our stuff, throw away clothes that haven’t fit in years or dishes that might be pretty but are broken and just live in the garage now.

So where do you fit into the spectrum? Do you like to pile on the color and texture in your home, or do you prefer a more serene environment?

Whether you’re into minimalism or maximalism, we can help you find your next home to make your own. Visit DarleneReeves-Kline.com to search our listings.