Campfire Ghost Tales

Check out a few local “haunted” places!

Every year there comes a season for telling tales to make your short hairs stand up, for giving you the shivers, for making the friendly light of a bonfire turn trees and shadows into dancing ghosts … if you think I’m talking about Halloween, think again!

It’s camping season, and the weather has been great for it! Aside from all this rain from Tropical Storm Cindy, we’ve had days and nights of mild weather and even relatively low humidity here in pleasant East Tennessee. All this sweet summer weather makes it just right to pitch a tent in the backyard, roast hot dogs over a camp fire and chase fireflies in the twilight.

But, when the moon is out and the fire gets low, the time for telling tales is just right. Locals know that East Tennessee is famous for storytelling! With misty apparitions, magical fireflies and mysterious late-night animal noises, the background is perfect for some old-fashioned yarn-spinning! And, something about a good campfire brings out the best ghost stories.

priscilla-du-preez-244488

Here are a few infamously haunted places in our area to get your campfire tales started:

Bethesda Church and Cemetery in Morristown, Tennessee

Reportedly, Confederate soldiers buried here at the cemetery don’t take kindly to visitors with *ahem* Yankee accents coming around. Stories of women weeping, misty, foggy shapes and general creepy feelings surround this historic site when the sun goes down and the moon comes out. If you find yourself wandering outside the cemetery at night, you’d best starting whistling Dixie!

Greeneville, Tennessee: General Morgan Inn

HauntedPlaces.org lists historic General Morgan Inn as one of its haunted places. Green Room Grace, a waitress in times of yore, is supposedly playful and fun. Her favorite prank is snatching spoons from the hotel restaurant! Maybe they’ll renovate the hotel someday and find a whole stash of tarnished spoons behind a wall!

Jonesboro, Tennessee

The oldest official town of Tennessee, this place has two reportedly haunted hotels! The Hawley House Bed and Breakfast and the Historic Eureka Inn have given guests the heebie-jeebies with late-night whispers, unexplained footsteps and shadowy figures,  thought to be the spirits of women who once worked in the hotels.

Glenmore Mansion in Jefferson City, Tennessee

It’s rare that a ghost announces he’ll be a ghost before he passes, but that’s what witnesses say happened at the famous Glenmore Mansion! This Victorian gem, restored and maintained by diligent locals, is reportedly a favorite spot for now-deceased historian Thomas Roach. Witnesses have seen a friendly, misty figure roaming the property. There have also been sightings of an apparition of a woman in white in the upper windows at night.

Looking for more ghost stories? Check out these haunted tours by Appalachian Ghost Walks!

If you like to hear a masterful tale spinner, then Jonesboro, Tennessee is the place for you. The International Storytelling Center there has events year-round for audiences and participants alike! You have plenty of time to plan to attend this year’s National Storytelling Festival, October 6-8, 2017.

Interested in looking for the perfect backyard to tell your own campfire tales? Check out DarleneReeves-Kline.com!

Summer Family Fun in East Tennessee!

Looking for family fun in East Tennessee this summer?

It’s after Memorial Day, and officially June, which means it’s summer vacation time! What will your kids be doing during these sunny, fun days? Our area has some fabulous, family-oriented activities to keep your kids’ brains and bodies busy this season.

Local Libraries

Our local libraries in Morristown, Jefferson City, Blaine and Dandridge offer summer reading programs for kids of all ages. Big kids who participate in the reading challenges can win prizes! Toddler story times are a fun opportunity for parents to get out of the house with little ones, and get the love of reading started at an early age! Contact your local library to get the weekly program schedule, and get reading!

randi-plake-42253

Public Pools

The public pool at Panther Creek State Park in Morristown is a fun place to swim, and you can enjoy the park while you’re at it! There is a playground for younger kids, and miles of trails for biking, running, hiking and even horseback riding. If you ask one of the staff members, they can point you to a good place to take a dip in the lake, as well; the park includes lots of lake shore access. Jefferson City has a pool at their community center, too. Public pools are a great (and affordable!) way to get out, get wet and get some exercise!

 

Splash Pads

Morristown has some great splash pads for kids small and big (and don’t be surprised if you see adults turn into big kids at the splash pad!) If you’ve never visited one of these, be prepared for lots of giggles: the water spouts up from holes in the “pad” to surprise and douse anyone brave enough to play. The Rotary Splash Pad is in Fred Miller Park and the Kiwanis Splash Pad is in Cherokee Park. Bring your towels and sunscreen and they’ll provide the fun!

Parks

We’ve posted about our great parks in the past! In addition to the splash pad, Cherokee Park has fun playgrounds for the little ones and a first-class disc golf course for the bigger kids (and grown-ups!) Public lake beaches in Hamblen and Jefferson Counties make you feel like you’re on vacation practically in your own backyard.

Summer Programs

Many of our area’s community centers and kid-centered programs offer safe, educational and fun summer day programs. Here are a few examples: the Boys & Girls Club of Morristown has a great summer program for kids. The Rose Center and Encore Theatre Company also offer affordable summer camps. Carson-Newman University offers a kids’ summer program.

joe-pizzio-192807

Events

Looking for theatre events, concerts, tournaments and more? Check out Morristown’s official events website for all kinds of family-friendly summer entertainment!

With all these great options for family entertainment in our area, the challenge is no longer “what is there to do?” Now, it’s “how can we fit it all in!”

Of course, if you’re looking to buy a home in our beautiful part of Tennessee, please check us out at DarleneReeves-Kline.com. Have a happy, healthy summer!

East TN, A Great Place for Families

Many of the best qualities of our area make it a fantastic place to be for those in any stage of life.

We’ve written a lot about how attractive East Tennessee can be to retirees, but what about young families? Many of the best qualities of our area—the weather, low taxes, relaxed lifestyle—make it a fantastic place to be for those in any stage of life. Read on to find out more!

Low Taxes

Tennessee has some of the best tax rates in the country. We don’t have an income tax, and our property taxes are very reasonable. This means your money stretches a lot farther when you work and own a home, here.

More House for the Money

Compared to other states, the price of homes in East Tennessee is much more reasonable. Basically, you can get more house for your money here than comparable homes elsewhere! Many families discover they can own their own piece of lake real estate for tens of thousands less than it would cost elsewhere.

beach in jefferson city
Public Beach at Jefferson City

Higher Standard of Living

In addition to lower land taxes and zero income tax, your money goes farther around here because the comparative cost of living is lower for a higher standard of living, compared to other states. What can this mean for your family? It means you can take the extra money you’re not spending on basics like energy bills and groceries, and invest them for a comfy, early retirement (in wallet-friendly East Tennessee, of course!) Or, it means an extra family vacation per year. No matter how you choose to allocate your saved money, it equals an elevated quality of life.

And here’s a nice perk: the state of Tennessee recently began a program for free tuition to all its state community colleges. Which brings us to our next point:

Nice Place to Raise Young ‘Uns

Even if you choose to buy a house in the city, or in a subdivision, you can still reap the rewards of a laid-back rural lifestyle. Any town in the region has easy, public access to lake parks and beaches. The most popular fall activity is visiting the local corn mazes. State and National Parks offer free enjoyment of nature. You get the picture: our neck of the woods is a pretty relaxing, wholesome place to be.

Have a Vacation in Your Back Yard!

Thousands of people flock to the Smokies, and surrounding areas, every year for the mild summers, amazing fall leaves and even the stark beauty of the mountains in winter. Living here, you can take a brief drive and feel like you’re on vacation. Trust us, the beauty never gets old. If you get too familiar with your own county, taking a drive to the next lake or park is enough to remind you how diverse the beauty of our fair state is.

gabby-orcutt-74607

Our lovely part of the state offers the best of many worlds. Lake living, mountain living, farm living, even city living, are all within short day trips. And, with the low cost of living, you can afford to experience all of it!

 

Of course, if you have any more questions about living in East Tennessee, or if you want to start searching for houses in the area, check out DarleneReeves-Kline.com.

 

 

Day in the Life of a Tennessee Retiree

We interviewed a real retiree to find out what her life is like in East Tennessee.

We’ve written a lot about how great our corner of Tennessee is for retiree living. You already know about the low taxes, amazing scenery, fun festivals, parks and lakes to check out. We’ve even told you about how much more house you can get for your money compared to other states!

But what does a real retiree’s day look like in these parts? We interviewed one to find out.

J. lives in Morristown. She recently downsized from a two hundred acre farm to six acres just off the beaten path. She spent her professional life as a public schoolteacher. J. was gracious enough to give us a sample schedule of one of her recent days. Read on to find out more!

A Day in the Retirement Life of J.

7 a.m.: Wake up, get my morning cup of coffee and enjoy it on my back deck. The sunrise is absolutely amazing, full of orange and pink this morning! I hear birds chirping and the neighbor’s cows come over to moo hello from over the fence. It’s such a great morning, I decide to get another cup of coffee and enjoy it with the newspaper.

steinar-engeland-141171

8 a.m.: Time to go to the gym. It’s only about a ten minute drive to my favorite one in Morristown. I go at least three times a week. Sometimes more, if I have time. I prefer spin and yoga classes.

9:30 a.m.: After exercise and grabbing a few groceries in town, the weather is still nice enough to work out in my garden. I recently completed my Master Gardener class through the University of Tennessee extension service. I’m trying to get my shade garden up to snuff. My roses look great this year!

benjamin-combs-27617

11 a.m.: After an early lunch on the front porch, I might take a few minutes to read a book on my Kindle or take a nap. I prefer the front porch for this time of day; it’s shadier and cooler. It catches a great breeze, too.

1:30 p.m.: I’m getting ready to head over to Rogersville for a painting class at the gallery. I started painting after retirement, and the art community in the area is fantastic: supportive, creative and fun! I prefer impressionist paintings, myself. I have a particularly challenging barn picture I’m working on, and my teacher is great about showing me what it needs to really get it finished.

3:30 p.m.: After my art class, I stop in to a couple thrift stores on my way back home. I like to keep stocked up on play clothes for my grandkids, when they come over. Sometimes I help them paint some pictures, or dig around in the garden. They usually get dirty somehow at Grandma’s house!

4:30 p.m.: My husband reminded me of a free music concert going on at the park in Morristown. We’re off to enjoy the show and grab a bite of supper after!

 

Thanks for letting us get a peek into your day, J!

 

As always, check out DarleneReeves-Kline.com for more info about how you can enjoy retirement in East Tennessee.

Two of the Coolest Bugs in East Tennessee

Plants, animals and bugs (and people!) of many varieties thrive in East Tennessee.

East Tennessee is a vibrant, lush place to live. Plants, animals and bugs (and people!) of many varieties thrive here. If you’re drawn to the outdoors, like many Tennessee residents are, you’ve probably noticed a few interesting species. On this week’s blog we’re featuring two species of bugs you’re sure to encounter soon, if you haven’t seen them already!

Fireflies

Fireflies, or lightning bugs, are not an unusual sight for anyone living in the southeast part of the United States. But, for those moving in from western states like Montana or Colorado, fireflies seem truly magical! We have lots of these glowy creatures. We have a great climate for them, as well as plenty of places for them to live, since they like the damp, rotting wood that’s found on the floors of our forests.

janus-clemmensen-52724
This is a great firefly habitat!

Here are a few fun facts about fireflies: it’s usually the males who fly around, signaling to find mates. The females are what we think of as “glow worms,” and they are usually very different from males. They don’t have wings, and instead look like grubs on the ground (similar to larvae, actually.) They glow their own kinds of signals to the males. In the Great Smoky Mountains, there is a special place where fireflies synchronize. It’s a pretty amazing sight! The woods go from very dark to completely lit up in pops of light. You have to buy tickets to reserve a spot to see these amazing creatures.

But, you can still enjoy your own lovely backyard firefly show during the summer months. They might not synchronize, but it’s still a magical sight.

Cicadas

These creatures are fascinating, because they have either 13- or 17-year life cycles. They have a distinct, rise-and-fall whine that tunes up at night during the spring months, lasting far into the summer. Usually, 17-year cicadas live in northern states and 13-year cicadas live in southern states. Because of Tennessee’s location, we get both 13 and 17-year cicadas.

The cicada life cycle is fascinating. The female lays eggs in slits in trees, which then hatch in six or seven weeks. The nymphs make their way into the soil to live and eat tree sap from roots for 13 or 17 years, before coming back up to the surface and morphing into adults. If you look for them, you can see the nymph skins left behind on tree trunks and sides of buildings. (Kids are great at spotting these!) Adults are colorful, with black-veined wings and bright red eyes. They don’t bite.

sunset-girl-399
Listen for cicadas tuning up after sunset!

You might be worried about cicadas harming your saplings, and you’d be right. Cicada nymphs under the soil don’t noticeably hurt trees, but adult females laying her eggs in trees can cause damage during this process. Check out this website for more information about how to protect your trees from cicada damage.

If you’re interested in finding about more about living in East Tennessee, please check out DarleneReeves-Kline.com.

Tennessee: A Great Choice for Retirement

What does Tennessee have to offer retirees?

Retirees of today are living longer and enjoying life at a much higher level than this demographic ever has before. They know what they want out of life, and they’ve saved diligently to reach their goals!

So, what do retirees look for across America, and what does Tennessee have to offer them? Read on to find out more! Be sure to click the highlighted links to more articles on the subject.

deer
A common sight in East Tennessee: white-tailed deer.

This article outlines the results of a survey comparing what retirees in America thought they would pursue after they punched their last time card with what they actually do now. Surprisingly, many retirees who thought they would spend the majority of their time in leisure activities, like visiting museums, golfing or painting, got bored with those things quickly. Instead, they found more value in the time they spent volunteering and even working part-time! Feeling connected to their community added value to their lives.

In addition, many retirees wanted to keep their toes in and add value to the workforce by consulting, or even opening their own businesses. Those who are just starting out in the business world benefit tremendously from a mentorship with someone who’s been there, and done that. It’s a satisfying relationship for people at either end of the work life spectrum.

Traveling and continuing education round out retiree activities. People get a deep sense of satisfaction when they achieve the lifelong goals of getting the degree or certificate they’ve always wanted, and visiting places that have been on that “bucket list” for ages.

So, where does Tennessee fit in with the parts of a retiree lifestyle?

vitaly-145502
Your money goes further in Tennessee.

With one of the most favorable lifestyle vs. expense rates in the nation, living here means you can have a comfortable home with money leftover to pursue all the activities you want! Property and tax expenses are dramatically lower than they are in other parts of the country, and the milder summers and winters mean heating and air bills aren’t through the roof.

Our local community colleges, like Walters State, offer free or dramatically reduced community classes to keep your mind fresh. Community centers like Rose Center in Morristown offer art, exercise and other classes, too. Click here for a list of colleges offering free or discounted tuition for senior citizens in Tennessee.

jonas-vincent-2717
Volunteer at your local animal shelter.

Local churches, humane societies and Friends of the Smokies offer more volunteer time than you can possibly fit in, with the opportunity to make like-minded friends and make a positive difference in your community!

Fitting in leisure is easy here, too, with hundreds of town, state and national parks within a short walk or drive from anywhere in East Tennessee. Each season brings regional free or low-admission festivals and events like choir concerts and plays.
Please visit DarleneReeves-Kline.com to find out more about living your retirement dream in East Tennessee!

Spring Festivals in East Tennessee

Once the warm weather starts, it’s officially festival season.

Now that spring is here, it’s time for one of the best parts of family life here in East Tennessee: the festivals! From car enthusiasts to artists, people around here love to get out for more than just hiking in the Smokies. Once the warm weather starts, it’s officially festival season. We’ve rounded up a few happening in the area. Read on to find out more:

daisy.jpg

Morristown:

Annual Spring Thyme in the Garden

Located at the Rose Center

On Earth Day: April 22

Presented by the Garden Thyme Herb Society, this annual event is the perfect kickoff to the year’s gardening season! Buy your herbs, flowers and other plants, as well as yard art, signs, pottery and other art. There will be live music and food available, and more! Visit rosecenter.org for more information about this and other Rose Center events.

13th Annual Strawberry Festival

Located at 510 West Economy Road

This free community event features family friendly vendors, food and events, all geared toward celebrating the year’s strawberry harvest. Visit their website for more information.

Sevierville:

Bloomin’ Barbeque & Bluegrass

May 19 and 20

Do you enjoy live bluegrass music, world-class barbeque (seriously: this is a World Food Championship qualifier event!) and other fun festivities? Head to Sevierville this May! This year, Ricky Scaggs and Kentucky Thunder will be live on Saturday! Think you’ve got what it takes to win the Mountain Soul Vocal Competition? Then bring your pipes and your favorite Dolly Parton songs to sing. And don’t forget to try some amazing barbeque while you’re here. Click here for more information.

spring flower

Knoxville:

Dogwood Arts Festival

Located on Market Square

April 28-30

This one is a regional favorite, celebrating spring and the arts! It’s a beautiful combination. This festival has plenty to do for adults and children, with public art displays, cooking demonstrations, entertainment and activities for the family, and more! Check out the site for more information.

Vestival

Located at the old Candoro Marble Building in South Knoxville

Mother’s Day Weekend (May 13)

Music, art, food, hand-crafted goods and tons of history abound at this annual event. The Candoro Arts and Heritage Center was once central to the Tennessee Pink Marble industry—a fascinating subject all by itself! Whether you’re a mother or want to honor yours, this is a great event to share. Visit the website to find out more.

International Biscuit Festival

Market Square

May 20

You know you’re really in the south when you find a whole festival dedicated to biscuits. The $15 ticket pays for 5 separate biscuit samples, so come hungry and visit Biscuit Boulevard first thing! Visit the site to learn more.

Be sure to check out DarleneReeves-Kline.com if you’re looking to find (or sell!) your home in East Tennessee.