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Once a week we’ll be posting about life in our beautiful corner of southern Appalachia!

Welcome to DarleneReevesKline.Wordpress.com, your new source for information about culture, lifestyle and, of course, real estate right here in East Tennessee. Once a week we’ll be posting about local businesses, festivals, and great things to do in our beautiful corner of southern Appalachia! We’ll also give you useful information about our state’s low taxes and low cost of living, which makes it the perfect place to start a family or enjoy retirement to the fullest.

Visit http://www.darlenereeves-kline.com/ for local listings.

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Historic Appalachia: Resort Hot Spot!

Appalachia was the vacation spot of choice for droves of travelers in the late-19th and early-20th centuries.

Travel is so easy nowadays. All we have to do to get out of town is hop in the car, gas it up and drive down the interstate. Or, we can head to the McGee-Tyson Airport in Alcoa (just outside Knoxville) and hop on a two-hour flight to Florida for palm trees and sandy beaches. It wasn’t so long ago—less than two generations—that travel was very difficult, time-consuming and expensive! In that era of days-long train travel, the upper-middle-class of America came by the car-load (train car, that is) to Appalachia.

You read right: Appalachia was the vacation spot of choice for droves of travelers in the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Many leisure travelers lived inside cities, where industry was concentrated, so to get outside the brick-and-cobble jungle was a real treat for body and soul. In fact, during our country’s Industrial Revolution, medical doctors prescribed trips to the green, coal-smokeless hills of North Carolina and Tennessee on a regular basis. (That’s how the Vanderbilts ended up in Asheville: a trip for clean air away from railway smoke.)

The little towns of Dandridge, Morristown and Bean Station all had their tourist spots. Oh, they’d never give Dollywood a run for their money, but in their heyday the rural hot springs and bed-and-breakfasts did a pretty good business. Some of these places still retain a glint of their former allure. You can go there and walk, or sit awhile and see a glimpse of what it might have been like to enjoy the finest of rural American vacations at the turn of last century.

Dandridge

This gem of a town still retains its hardy brick buildings, some over a hundred and fifty years old. Although the TVA dammed the river nearby to flood most of the richest farmland, changing the landscape surrounding the town, many historic homes and businesses remain intact.

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Bean Station

Not much remains of the Tate House Springhouse resort these days; the 500-guest hotel was demolished years ago. There is still a lovely spring, though, and the pavilion is a local favorite spot for prom and wedding photo shoots. Its close proximity to the lake makes this a sweet little spot to stop by for a picnic.

Clinton

Part of the “White Lighting Trail,” this little town just outside Knoxville has a great, historic downtown ripe for strolling and enjoying a meal. Plus, if you like antiquing, this place holds some fabulous treasures.

Morristown

The General Longstreet Museum, Crockett Tavern Museum and Rose Center for the Arts all hold turn-of-last-century allure, giving a glimpse into the life and times of those who lived, loved and made a life in Morristown pre- and post-civil war.

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Modern vacation tastes often run to bright lights and rich foods, exciting rides and never-seen-before entertainment. We could take a page from vacationers of yore, who took a prescription for cleaner, Appalachian air and headed away from the overstimulating city for the noise of cicadas and crickets, the gentle breezes and distractions of a good game of lawn croquet.

Interested in owning your own little piece of history? Go to DarleneReeves-Kline.com to find properties for sale in lovely East Tennessee.

Cost of Living: By the Numbers

Let’s break down the cost difference between a more expensive city and Morristown, Tennessee.

By now, you’ve probably heard that Tennessee has one of the most favorable cost of living vs. quality of life ratings in the whole country. We decided to break down what this means in terms of real things you’re likely to buy.

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If you’re moving from the Albany, New York metro area to Morristown, Tennessee, you’re about to be pleasantly surprised at how far your money goes. According to this cost comparison calculator, you can take about a 17% decrease in household income, and maintain the same quality of life you had up north.

That means if your household brought in $50,000.00, you could make less than $41,500.00 and still enjoy life! Conversely, that means if your income stays the same after you move, you’ll have 17% more value out of your money to save or take an extra vacation. That’s great news if you’re considering moving for work with the same salary, or if you’re one of the many retirees who have discovered that your fixed income would go much farther in our beautiful part of the country.

How do things like mortgages and groceries compare between New York and East Tennessee?

Let’s look at a few examples:

According to the cost of living calculator, the average home price in Albany is $397,060.67. The price for a comparable home in Morristown, Tennessee: $235,086.33. The difference: $161,974.33

That’s a huge difference! The great news is that Morristown has a great market of beautiful homes for someone looking to upgrade, downgrade or just get into their first home. It’s a diverse market in more than just price; lake homes, mini (or big!) farms, subdivisions … Morristown has a lot to offer.

What about daily living? Here’s how groceries compare:

Lettuce in Albany: $1.83 In Morristown: $1.43 Difference: $0.40

Canola Oil in Albany: $3.76 In Morristown: $2.95 Difference: $0.80

Dozen Eggs in Albany: $2.65 In Morristown: $2.26 Difference: $0.39

Coffee in Albany: $4.40 In Morristown: $4.20 Difference: $0.20

If that’s all you needed to buy this trip to the store, you’ve saved $1.79.

This is just a sampling, but you can definitely see how even a few dollars per grocery trip can add up to hundreds by the end of the year! That’s money that can go toward a trip to Dollywood, or back into your investment account to earn even more money. (And, don’t worry, if you need a good banker: we have plenty of those, too.)

There’s a lot more to love about our area than just lower cost of living. Remember that part we mentioned about good quality of life? We have all four seasons here in East Tennessee, with gorgeous spring flowers, stunning autumn leaves, lush, green summers and just enough winter weather to leave us all refreshed and ready for warmth again.

Let’s do a quick winter weather comparison between Albany and Morristown.

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The average high temperature for January and February in Albany is 31 degrees and 35 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively. For Morristown: 46 and 51 degrees are the average high for January and February. The numbers prove it: our winters are much milder down here!

Between mild weather and lower costs, we’ve got what it takes to live life a little easier around here.

If you’re interested in finding out more about homes for sale in East Tennessee, visit DarleneReeves-Kline.com.

Summer Bucket List

Here’s a list of fun, family-friendly summer activities right here in East Tennessee!

There’s so much great stuff to do with your family here in East Tennessee, sometimes it can be hard to keep it all straight! We’ve compiled a list of things you should check out before the days start to get shorter, the nights get that crisp edge and the fireflies fade away for the season. Read on!

Visit the Zoo!

Easily accessible of I40 in East Knoxville, the zoo has lots to see and do. They recently revamped their tiger habitat, bringing you up close and personal to their gorgeous, endangered Malayan tigers! Asian Trek, where the tigers now live, is also home to rare cranes, and primates.

We’ve had thunder-stormy weather lately, but when the skies dry out you can have fun on the splash pad. The zoo has changing rooms and lockers available for your dry stuff, so you can still see the rest of the animals without feeling too soggy.

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Check out Dollywood!

This theme park in Sevierville is a local and national favorite! Dolly is always changing up the performances, so each visit is a whole new experience. In the summer, the park lights up the sky with fireworks each night. There are roller coaster rides, local artists and artisans giving live performances, and lots of food to try. Don’t forget Splash Country, as long as you’re headed that way!

Picnic at the Park

We can’t say enough about our wonderful parks. A low-key afternoon playing on the swings and slides, a competitive game of disc golf, splashing at the edge of the lake … it’s a classic summer day! Bring a cooler with some sandwiches and Popsicles (and sunscreen) and you’re all set.

We also have some great splash pads at our parks, so pack your swimsuits and towels!

Take a Hike

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is in our backyard, and it’s spectacular. You can choose anything from a stroll to a rigorous day hike, to even backpacking into the backcountry—but be sure to check with the Park’s rangers to find out about permitting.

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We have lots of wildlife in the mountains, including bears, so be cautious. Never, ever attempt to feed the bears! When you feed bears, you’re giving them a death sentence. Rangers can’t keep bears away from people once they’ve figured out that humans are a food source, so sometimes the only answer is to euthanize them.

Cade’s Cove

This settlement, located in the Smokies, is accessible by car. It’s a glimpse back in time, to when communities had to be self-reliant. You can park and take one of the many day hikes just off the paved loop, or just walk up to one of the cabins, or even the old mill. Cade’s Cove is a living history lesson!

White Water Rafting

Our area is full of natural wonders, and the beautiful mountains can’t get all the credit! The Big Pigeon River, in Hartford, Tennessee and the Ocoee River, about an hour east of Chattanooga, offer thrills you can’t experience anywhere else! Take a guided raft tour of the rivers and stay the night in a nearby cabin, or head back home in time to grill out for supper.

Interested in finding out more about the lifestyle here in East Tennessee? Check out DarleneReeves-Kline.com.

Happy Independence Day In East Tennessee

Suggestions on where to enjoy 2017 Fourth of July fireworks in East Tennessee!

Celebrating the Fourth of July is a grand old tradition for any red-blooded American, and we in East Tennessee are no exception. It’s a great time of year; it kind of feels like the smack-dab middle of summer. It’s starting to really get humid and hot, and the days have hit their longest. Fireflies are still out in the twilight, and grills have been firing up on weekends for months, now! And, let’s not forget to mention the awesome lake recreation this year, since we’ve been getting fabulous doses of rain in between these sunny days.

Some people from out of town are surprised to learn that they can buy fireworks and set them on fire on their own property here in Tennessee. There are a few exceptions to this, of course: use caution, don’t aim them at people or set them off near crowds. And don’t light anything explosive within city limits. And, beware of terrified pets (especially your own!) Keep them in the house, barn or pen where they can feel safer and be less likely to bolt in panic from all the explosions in the sky.

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If you’re not the light-it-yourself kind, and you’re looking for something with a little more pow than the kiddos’ sparklers, there are some public celebrations planned near you!

Morristown

The annual Fourth of July Celebration at Cherokee Park is set for Tuesday, July 4 at 5 p.m. It’s a free event, but the rescue squad will be asking for donation for parking. It’s family-friendly, with live music, food vendors and (after dark) the traditional fireworks display! Check this website for details.

Jefferson City

If you’re closer to Jefferson County than Hamblen County, check out the city’s annual Fourth of July parade. It gets going at 2 p.m. on the corner of Russel and Main St., heading past Carson-Newman University. Just remember to slather on the sunscreen and drink plenty of water, because this year’s July 4 is forecasted to be in the 90s. Visit their Facebook page to find out more.

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Gatlinburg

If you don’t mind huge crowds, Gatlinburg always hosts a midnight parade (“the first in the nation!”) to honor both our nation’s independence and the bravery of the city’s emergency responders after last year’s devastating wildfires. Check out this website to find out more about food vendors, fireworks and other entertainment.

Knoxville

Another highly attended celebration is the Fourth of July Celebration at World’s Fair Park. Lots of good company, live music, food vendors and, of course fireworks when the sun goes down. Visit the World’s Fair Park website to get more details.

Celebrations all over East Tennessee!

For a more comprehensive lists of locations and times for you and your family to ooh and aah over fireworks this year, visit this WATE page.

 

Of course, if you’re interested in moving to one of the fairest states in this wonderful, independent United States of America, check out DarleneReeves-Kline.com. We can help you with one of the sweetest parts of the American dream: owning your very own home, here in East Tennessee.

Campfire Ghost Tales

Check out a few local “haunted” places!

Every year there comes a season for telling tales to make your short hairs stand up, for giving you the shivers, for making the friendly light of a bonfire turn trees and shadows into dancing ghosts … if you think I’m talking about Halloween, think again!

It’s camping season, and the weather has been great for it! Aside from all this rain from Tropical Storm Cindy, we’ve had days and nights of mild weather and even relatively low humidity here in pleasant East Tennessee. All this sweet summer weather makes it just right to pitch a tent in the backyard, roast hot dogs over a camp fire and chase fireflies in the twilight.

But, when the moon is out and the fire gets low, the time for telling tales is just right. Locals know that East Tennessee is famous for storytelling! With misty apparitions, magical fireflies and mysterious late-night animal noises, the background is perfect for some old-fashioned yarn-spinning! And, something about a good campfire brings out the best ghost stories.

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Here are a few infamously haunted places in our area to get your campfire tales started:

Bethesda Church and Cemetery in Morristown, Tennessee

Reportedly, Confederate soldiers buried here at the cemetery don’t take kindly to visitors with *ahem* Yankee accents coming around. Stories of women weeping, misty, foggy shapes and general creepy feelings surround this historic site when the sun goes down and the moon comes out. If you find yourself wandering outside the cemetery at night, you’d best starting whistling Dixie!

Greeneville, Tennessee: General Morgan Inn

HauntedPlaces.org lists historic General Morgan Inn as one of its haunted places. Green Room Grace, a waitress in times of yore, is supposedly playful and fun. Her favorite prank is snatching spoons from the hotel restaurant! Maybe they’ll renovate the hotel someday and find a whole stash of tarnished spoons behind a wall!

Jonesboro, Tennessee

The oldest official town of Tennessee, this place has two reportedly haunted hotels! The Hawley House Bed and Breakfast and the Historic Eureka Inn have given guests the heebie-jeebies with late-night whispers, unexplained footsteps and shadowy figures,  thought to be the spirits of women who once worked in the hotels.

Glenmore Mansion in Jefferson City, Tennessee

It’s rare that a ghost announces he’ll be a ghost before he passes, but that’s what witnesses say happened at the famous Glenmore Mansion! This Victorian gem, restored and maintained by diligent locals, is reportedly a favorite spot for now-deceased historian Thomas Roach. Witnesses have seen a friendly, misty figure roaming the property. There have also been sightings of an apparition of a woman in white in the upper windows at night.

Looking for more ghost stories? Check out these haunted tours by Appalachian Ghost Walks!

If you like to hear a masterful tale spinner, then Jonesboro, Tennessee is the place for you. The International Storytelling Center there has events year-round for audiences and participants alike! You have plenty of time to plan to attend this year’s National Storytelling Festival, October 6-8, 2017.

Interested in looking for the perfect backyard to tell your own campfire tales? Check out DarleneReeves-Kline.com!

Fixer Uppers!

We put together a few tips to consider when you’re looking for a fixer upper!

With the explosion of popularity of the HGTV show “Fixer Upper,” thousands more homebuyers are on the hunt for the gem hidden behind a facade of neglect or just bad design choices from years gone by (ahem: baby food-green shag carpet, anyone?)

Not every house is worth fixing up, though! For every one house that hides gleaming wood floors underneath threadbare carpets, you could view three that have severe water damage or a foundation so bad you’ll want to hightail it out of the house for fear the whole thing will crash down on your head!

How can you get a ride on the fixer upper train? We’ve pulled together a few tips to help you get started. Read on to find out more!

Foundations

We decided to start at the bottom because, arguably, it’s the most important part of the house. If your house has a bad foundation, you’ve got the real estate equivalent of a game of Russian Roulette. It could be easily fixed with the addition of metal columns to shore up the concrete blocks. OR, you could discover it will take upwards of $50,000 to completely jack up the house, remove the unstable foundation and replace it with a working one. The problem is, you might not know what you have on your hands until you start (literally) digging in.

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The solution? Train your eyes to check out cracks and settling in the foundation. Is the roof line less than true? It could be a bad roof, or it could be the result of a foundation sinking on one side, bringing the rest of the house with it. Obvious, big cracks in the mortar of the foundation? Red flag. And always, always, get a professional’s opinion on the state of the house.

Tip: It might be a good idea to view the house after a strong storm. If water is coming into the basement, you’ll be able to see it in action.

Roof

We mentioned the top of the house already. A sturdy roof is very important in maintaining your home. It keeps out the weather and unwanted critters, but a good roof also keeps the house insulated: warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. Get up there and look at it! Are the shingles bald? Crumbly? Are there dips in the roof?

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Even if the shingles need replacing, you can sometimes get away with just putting a fresh layer on top of the old ones. If you need a whole new roof, it will set you back thousands. That might not be a deal breaker, especially if you can put in the labor yourself.

Bones

Does the house “speak to you?” Can you see a vision of your future in it? Maybe if you knock down a wall there, add a window in over here … if the layout of the house is absolutely terrible, you might be able to open it all up. Or, you might realize you’d basically have to rebuild the entire structure to get it how you want it.

Feeling inspired to look for your next diamond in the rough? Visit DarleneReeves-Kline.com and let’s get started!

Summer Family Fun in East Tennessee!

Looking for family fun in East Tennessee this summer?

It’s after Memorial Day, and officially June, which means it’s summer vacation time! What will your kids be doing during these sunny, fun days? Our area has some fabulous, family-oriented activities to keep your kids’ brains and bodies busy this season.

Local Libraries

Our local libraries in Morristown, Jefferson City, Blaine and Dandridge offer summer reading programs for kids of all ages. Big kids who participate in the reading challenges can win prizes! Toddler story times are a fun opportunity for parents to get out of the house with little ones, and get the love of reading started at an early age! Contact your local library to get the weekly program schedule, and get reading!

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Public Pools

The public pool at Panther Creek State Park in Morristown is a fun place to swim, and you can enjoy the park while you’re at it! There is a playground for younger kids, and miles of trails for biking, running, hiking and even horseback riding. If you ask one of the staff members, they can point you to a good place to take a dip in the lake, as well; the park includes lots of lake shore access. Jefferson City has a pool at their community center, too. Public pools are a great (and affordable!) way to get out, get wet and get some exercise!

 

Splash Pads

Morristown has some great splash pads for kids small and big (and don’t be surprised if you see adults turn into big kids at the splash pad!) If you’ve never visited one of these, be prepared for lots of giggles: the water spouts up from holes in the “pad” to surprise and douse anyone brave enough to play. The Rotary Splash Pad is in Fred Miller Park and the Kiwanis Splash Pad is in Cherokee Park. Bring your towels and sunscreen and they’ll provide the fun!

Parks

We’ve posted about our great parks in the past! In addition to the splash pad, Cherokee Park has fun playgrounds for the little ones and a first-class disc golf course for the bigger kids (and grown-ups!) Public lake beaches in Hamblen and Jefferson Counties make you feel like you’re on vacation practically in your own backyard.

Summer Programs

Many of our area’s community centers and kid-centered programs offer safe, educational and fun summer day programs. Here are a few examples: the Boys & Girls Club of Morristown has a great summer program for kids. The Rose Center and Encore Theatre Company also offer affordable summer camps. Carson-Newman University offers a kids’ summer program.

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Events

Looking for theatre events, concerts, tournaments and more? Check out Morristown’s official events website for all kinds of family-friendly summer entertainment!

With all these great options for family entertainment in our area, the challenge is no longer “what is there to do?” Now, it’s “how can we fit it all in!”

Of course, if you’re looking to buy a home in our beautiful part of Tennessee, please check us out at DarleneReeves-Kline.com. Have a happy, healthy summer!